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INSPIRE BVI: Melville leaves Digicel with big plans

MELVILLE: “Being a young woman living on your own in the BVI – I am sure other women can relate, is challenging. I have never been in solitary confinement, but being here alone was very challenging.”

By Horace Mills, BVI News Online Staff

When Digicel popped the big question generally about voluntary redundancy, it was not challenging for Katasha Melville to voice the ‘I do’ declaration.

“I am actually grateful that Digicel has given persons that opportunity,” she told BVI News Online.

“Some persons might view it as something negative, but I see it as a positive, whereby it is an opportunity for me to advance my dream. It works for me.”

Melville, whose effortless smile and helpful disposition brought life to Digicel’s signature red offices in Road Town for the last seven years, severed ties with the telecoms company last Friday, April 28, 2017.

“I left Digicel because I am ready to take on a challenge and use the knowledge I got through the company’s empowerment,” she said.

Melville was among the first persons hired when Digicel opened its offices in Guyana’s capital a decade ago. She later migrated to Digicel BVI where she first served as a customer service rep; then she was promoted to assistant store manager; and then she shifted gear into marketing.

“My biggest growth happened during the time I was at Digicel. The person I am today is because of Digicel,” Melville further told BVI News Online.

The transition from Guyana and its culture to the BVI and its cultural melting pot was tough for the then 25-year-old. Living alone in the BVI also didn’t help.

“Being a young woman living on your own in the BVI – I am sure other women can relate, is challenging. I have never been in solitary confinement, but being here alone was very challenging.”

“That point of my journey was one of the lowest points, but it turned out to be one of the highest. I realized that the only way out was the way through. In the end, I became a stronger person,” added Melville, who grew up in a single-parent household in Guyana.

MELVILLE: “If you approach any service, do it with passion. If you can’t do it passionately, then maybe you just shouldn’t do it at all.”

Melville told BVI News Online that, while growing up, the bond with her mother Lorain was solid – and it still is.

“One of the things I learn that is really a foundation of my survival is that I never ever have the victim mentality; I never play the victim,” added the young mother, whose biggest delight these days is her son Jaygan Nathaniel, who will turn 11 months this week.

“Being a parent is one of the greatest assignments in life – just having an opportunity to mould a life. I look forward to the challenge, the enjoyment, [and] the journey… Jaygan has eight teeth and he is holding on and walking. It is just quite delightful just seeing him grow,” Melville further told BVI News Online.

In the meantime, Melville’s next professional journey involves business management. She will be managing her family’s business – The Soup Shop, which operates in Fish Bay and at Tortola Pier Park.

But, one wonders: Can the graduate of Guyana University who holds a diploma in marketing effectively manage a culinary operation? It boils down to leadership and customer service, Melville insists.

“For me, it doesn’t matter what field you are in. As long as you are a leader, you can lead anything. A leader is just a leader. I am good with people; I am good with organizing things. Although I might not have that culinary experience, I can definitely manage a person who has the experience,” added Melville.

She also mused that, if she were to relive her professional life, she would venture into no other field but customer service and marketing – and life coaching would be a huge addition.

“We are all involved in the service industry. Life is service; we were all born to serve,” she reasoned.

“If you approach any service, do it with passion. If you can’t do it passionately, then maybe you just shouldn’t do it at all. It doesn’t matter how much money you are earning, if you can’t live a life of passion, then, to me, that is like giving your soul in exchange for money – and we should never live that way. Our soul is the most important thing we have. Liberate your soul by living passionately,” Melville further said.

MELVILLE: “One of the things I learn that is really a foundation of my survival is that I never ever have the victim mentality; I never play the victim.”

Melville, who is pictured with her former colleagues in Guyana, was among the first persons hired when Digicel opened its offices in Guyana’s capital a decade ago.

Copyright 2018 BVI News, Media Expressions Limited. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed.

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