BVI News

Students defeat cops in marijuana debate

The St George’s Secondary School debate team with police commissioner Michael Matthews.

Members of the Virgin Islands Law Enforcement Training Academy (VILETA) came up short in convincing judges and a well-attended audience that cannabis should not be decriminalised for medicinal and religious use in the territory.

The debate which was held at the Road Town Police Station on Thursday night saw the proposition St George’s Secondary School, emerging champions after scoring 30.5 points and the best speaker award in the person of Nathan Cousins.

The VILETA who opposed the moot scored a total of 25.7 marks.

The debate

The secondary school debaters argued that cannabis has the healing properties to treat several conditions such as muscle spams, chrome’s diseases and can be a viable medical industry.

They said if appropriately used, cannabis can be life-changing.

It was further argued that it was unjust that groups such as the Rastafarian community should be barred from practising their religion in the confines of their homes.

To bring their point home, St George’s Secondary said they are proposing to decriminalise and not legalise cannabis, and there are multiple ways to utilise its benefits other than smoking.

“Anything can be an addiction,” Taynia Christopher argued while outlining other potential addictive things such as food, sex, work; all of which if not done in moderation could become harmful.

She said the opposing police academy was close-minded.

“Without knowledge the people perish,” she said.

The police’s argument

VILETA argued that cannabis is dangerous and can be a gateway drug.

They argued that the cost of treating cannabis addiction could rise and thus place an added burden to the state for rehabilitation.

“It’s like bringing a firearm to a verbal dispute,” Officer Sakena Codner said, adding that it was inappropriate.

They further maintained that to decriminalised the plant for medicinal and religious use would be gambling the territory of the British Virgin Islands.

Chief adjudicator Ayanna Baptiste-DaBreo said one of the main issues she noticed in the debate was the lack of evidence and the further lack of inclusion of local laws in the arguments.

The debate is part of the activities for RVIPF 2019 Police Week.

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6 Comments

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  1. Anonymous says:

    “Anything can be [addictive] an addiction,” Taynia Christopher argued while outlining other potential addictive things such as food, sex, work; all of which if not done in moderation could become harmful.

    Absolutely, scientifically proven.

    Indeed, the greatest epidemic of addicts and addiction the BVI and most modern societies face today, and which cost the most in short and long term treatment and medical resources is food addiction, not any form of leaf matter, ie marijuana.

    For example, though unscientific, in the BVI alone, there are at least five food addicts and obsessed persons to every one marijuana or even alcohol addict.

    Taynia also said, “the opposing police academy was close-minded.”

    “Without knowledge the people perish,” she said.

    What is quite shocking in the 21st century, is that the views of the RVIPF, led by HMQE representative of the UK presented data straight out of the 12th century. quite shocking indeed.

    Like 14
    • Anon says:

      I feel you on this.

      “For example, though unscientific, in the BVI alone, there are at least five food addicts and obsessed persons to every one marijuana or even alcohol addict.”

      there is nothing in marijuana thats addicting. the thing with marijuana is an obsession you mentally like the feeling of smoking and being high but if you were to stop youd be perfectly fine. if one smokes cigarettes and stop their body craves the nicotine. look at crack. people who do crack have to go to rehab and get pumped with more crack (a purer from) at a lower dosage because they could die if they quit cold turkey.

      see the difference?

      next example. i live in a state where it’s legal and i know people who smoke every day. and when they don’t smoke but take an edible they have the thc in their system but they be like id much prefer to just smoke it. so it has nothing to do with whether one smokes or ingests it. it’s not an addicting drug but one can because obsessed with the feeling of smoking and the way they feel when they are high.

  2. LOL says:

    IT SHOULD BE POLICE WEAK INSTEAD

    Like 12
    Dislike 2
  3. Awesome says:

    A great event on so many levels, congrats to all

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